Friday, April 29, 2011

Me too, me too!

What I would like to know is why it is limited to theologians and not open to philosophers?

Theology and philosophy go hand in hand. It is part of the intellectual renewal to ground theologians in the history of philosophy, its methodologies, and metaphysics. Otherwise you run into problems of credibility - not within the eyes of the world, but within the rigors of the field itself.

Philosophy has had a huge impact on the history of the world and our understanding of being - to be ignorant of that history is to deprive yourself of insights and leaves you open to errors that have been repeated time and again. The methodology of logic is indispensable for any being aspiring to the study of higher things. How do you politely say "oh hai!!! ur doing it wrong, Mr. Theologian - middle term must be distributed at least once in t'eh premises." Reason must be sharpened. And finally - metaphysics. How to stress its importance enough? I think I'll just point here.

Sunday, April 24, 2011

He's My Kind of Pope

"The world is a product of the Word, of the Logos, as Saint John expresses it, using a key term from the Greek language. “Logos” means “reason”, “sense”, “word”. It is not reason pure and simple, but creative Reason, that speaks and communicates itself. It is Reason that both is and creates sense. The creation account tells us, then, that the world is a product of creative Reason. Hence it tells us that, far from there being an absence of reason and freedom at the origin of all things, the source of everything is creative Reason, love, and freedom. Here we are faced with the ultimate alternative that is at stake in the dispute between faith and unbelief: are irrationality, lack of freedom and pure chance the origin of everything, or are reason, freedom and love at the origin of being? Does the primacy belong to unreason or to reason? This is what everything hinges upon in the final analysis. As believers we answer, with the creation account and with Saint John, that in the beginning is reason. In the beginning is freedom. Hence it is good to be a human person.
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Hence the world can be saved. Hence we can and must place ourselves on the side of reason, freedom and love – on the side of God who loves us so much that he suffered for us, that from his death there might emerge a new, definitive and healed life.
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The first day of the week was the third day after Jesus’ death. It was the day when he showed himself to his disciples as the Risen Lord. In truth, this encounter had something unsettling about it. The world had changed. This man who had died was now living with a life that was no longer threatened by any death. A new form of life had been inaugurated, a new dimension of creation. The first day, according to the Genesis account, is the day on which creation begins. Now it was the day of creation in a new way, it had become the day of the new creation. We celebrate the first day. And in so doing we celebrate God the Creator and his creation. Yes, we believe in God, the Creator of heaven and earth. And we celebrate the God who was made man, who suffered, died, was buried and rose again. We celebrate the definitive victory of the Creator and of his creation. We celebrate this day as the origin and the goal of our existence. We celebrate it because now, thanks to the risen Lord, it is definitively established that reason is stronger than unreason, truth stronger than lies, love stronger than death. We celebrate the first day because we know that the black line drawn across creation does not last for ever. We celebrate it because we know that those words from the end of the creation account have now been definitively fulfilled: “God saw everything that he had made, and behold, it was very good” (Gen 1:31). Amen."

-Pope Benedict XVI, Easter Vigil Homily 2011